Tag Archives: Telly Halkias

The last, true big-time college football game

When I’m out driving and want to take a mental break from news casts and jazz, I turn the dial to scratch that other itch of mine – sports. Recently while cruising home to New England from Virginia, I tuned in to a segment on the greatest rivalry in college football. Several callers touted Michigan-Ohio State, USC-Notre Dame, and […]

Is self-sacrifice instinct or moral choice?

I’ve always been amazed by accounts of selfless sacrifice – of those who give their lives so that others might carry on. Inherent in this is a question that perplexes and fascinates: how much are these acts rooted in instinct versus a predetermined outcome that people carry inside them based on their value system? This […]

Dad and the last bus from Pearl Harbor

When I was 10, my father, a former World War II fighter pilot, took me to see the joint American-Japanese production of “Tora! Tora! Tora!” The 1970 film was a major spectacle, portraying the Pearl Harbor attack from both sides. Its Academy Award-winning special effects left me mesmerized. Death, destruction, and history-changing events didn’t make […]

Why snow shoveling is good for the soul

   Friends and family know I never lose a chance to poke fun at myself over an obsession for shoveling snow, specifically the messes which accumulate in my driveway following storms. But in taking self-effacement to the nth degree I let some other thoughts slip by. This is a chance to make up that ground. More than […]

Is the art of restaurant tipping lost?

H., a waitress at a local eatery (to remain unnamed), approached my table. She checked to see if I needed more water, engaged in our usual chatter, then flashed me the check she had picked up from a party of 12. The food charge was well into three figures; the amount written in the tip […]

Will Mike Bloomberg run for President in 2016?

A few weeks back, around Election Day, I mused on the vilification of third party candidates in national elections as so-called “spoilers.” One prominent example I used was independent Eliot Cutler’s presence in Maine’s gubernatorial race, mostly to highlight the scapegoat quality these candidates inherit regardless of a ballot’s final results. But wait – it gets better. In all the […]

Veterans Day: A salute for Sgt. Potter

On Veterans Day, I’m taking a moment to honor Ricky Potter. Many years ago, when we were both in uniform, I was his boss, and he was my teacher. Sergeant Ricky Potter grew up in the South, born into a black family with no privilege. His muscular frame and impeccable bearing exuded pride. An athlete […]

Is Eliot Cutler really a spoiler?

  Even more important than the title of this piece: in free democratic elections, is there really such a thing as a spoiler? Or should every candidate fight for each vote to the bitter end? Easily this year’s most entertaining gubernatorial race is in Maine, where the contest between Gov. Paul LePage, (R), U.S. Rep. Mike Michaud,(D), and […]

Two maples, one prayer

The Iroquois considered the maple tree a sacred symbol, and a direct gift from God. For those native Americans, a maple’s wood and sap were valuable resources. They celebrated an annual thanksgiving festival with the rising of the sap to commemorate another year of the tree’s life, and their own as a nation. For the […]

How to kill a job interview

A former college student of mine once e-mailed me about an upcoming job interview, asking what things he should know, questions he may be asked, and how he might respond. His request couldn’t have been timelier; in this economy, employers are looking for any reason not to hire someone. But in my response and subsequent discussions […]